Harvesting Breath


“WOMAN and MAN”, 2001, ceramic, 14″ x 4″ x 2″
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Breath, breathing, song, snoring are all themes asking me for their attention these days.

A flock of meadowlarks is visiting my neighborhood.

They make me stop in my tracks and drop my jaw

Because they carry the antithesis of winter with them

Under each wing. Listen…

I woke yesterday in the half-light of dawn to catch my dog, Olivia

Curled at the small of my back

Snoring in utter surrender

To sleep and dreams.

Today, I noticed my voice caught up in my throat

A bit too high

And reducing me to more of a ‘child-woman’

(in the not-good’ sense).

This phenomenon usually occurs

When I am worried or scared.

I also came across this YouTube video

Of a visionary man

Who is a composer/conductor/musician by trade.

He filmed himself silently conducting a choral piece he had written

And posted it on his blog along with an invitation

To all who were moved to,

To send in a film snippet of themselves giving voice

To his creation.

The result is this compilation of 2000 voices

From around the world

Edited together

To form a virtual choir!

I watched myself

Have to ease into a slowed down version

Of my customary eagerness to do ‘stuff’ fast

And close my eyes

And breathe slowly

In order to give myself

The gift of a proper listen

To this miracle.

It was the very best thing I have done for my sweet self

In a very long time.

I wish for you, the gift of the preciousness

Of shared breath

Which is right there for the taking..

A bountiful harvest always in season.

comments

One Response to “Harvesting Breath”

  1. Kayla on April 14th, 2011

    i, too, find myself eager to do “stuff” fast. what a gift you’ve given me in this reminder to pause and be still. and a gift whitacre has given us all. technology is often berated for its distancing, isolating effect on human connection. but clearly it also can be a magical impetus for new kinds of human connection and interaction. the creation of great art from great distance and disconnect and then shared from one person who needed it to another through a blog. a bountiful harvest, indeed.

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